Origin of The Passing

I was sitting at a church in Houston called Bayou City Fellowship yesterday when I thought of an easy way to bring some light into the community. The idea would mature over the next hour into a service venture that I believe will be relatively simple to implement.

I was first blindsided by the idea due to the fact that there were no single, elderly individuals at the church I was attending. I was wondering how a church of any kind could function without at least some support of the elderly and their broadened scope of life experiences. This led me to think about how we digest information in the present day. I don’t come across pre-Baby Boomers, or many Baby Boomers, for that matter, in my everyday life. Most on the information I consume is coming from my peers or the members of Generation X and Y. Take movies, for example. I would guess that the median age for a filmmaker these days would land somewhere between 45 and 50. The actors and actresses that bring life to a screenwriter’s words probably enjoy an even lower mean/median age.

In the scope of everyday media, we are consistently consuming the ideas and beliefs of our peers, principally, and their peers. The technology boom of the last 20 years has made it much harder for the elderly to teach us what they’ve learned, to “pass on the torch.” My generation has become so accustomed to the overabundance of information and the overt overstimulation that the internet and mobile devices have provided that it’s hard for us to even find time for the elderly that have a special meaning in our lives. I always imagine that if my grandfathers would have survived their respective illnesses and not passed away when I was young, that I would always find time to heed their advice. The reality would probably be quite different from my intentions.

 

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